REGISTRATION

Category1 Registration Type Fee
Club Member CSCC Members $150.00 plus applicable taxes
  Non-Members $175.00 plus applicable taxes
Single Roundtable CSCC Members $25.00 plus applicable taxes
  Non-Members $30.00 plus applicable taxes

All CSCC Education Roundtables will be held on Thursdays and will be one (1) hour in length.
Eastern Pacific Mountain Central Atlantic Newfoundland
ON, QC BC AB, SK* MB, ON (West) NB, NS, PE, Lab NL
11:30-12:30 08:30-09:30 09:30-10:30 10:30-11:30 12:30-13:30 13:30-14:30
14:00-15:00 11:00-12:00 12:00-13:00 13:00-1400 15:00-16:00 16:00-17:00
* SK - During daylight savings time; otherwise one hour later

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1Save today! Club members are entitled to join any or all of the Roundtables. Register once only once automatically receive an invitation for each Roundtable and access to the slides and recordings of past roundtables for the current year.

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2019-2020 SCHEDULE

Time

  Date Time (Eastern) Presenter(s) Topic
 1 September 26, 2019  11:30-12:30  Ihssan Bouhtiauy, Daniel Gauthier, David Richardson Quality improvements from Canadian laboratories
 2 October 10, 2019  14:00-15:00  Daniel Beriault, Bradley Langford The Role of Procalcitonin in Antimicrobial Stewardship
 3 October 24, 2019  11:30-12:30  Ashley Newbigging
Vilte Banakauskas
Development of an enzyme-free and wash-free technique for cell surface imaging
Current status of laboratory reference intervals during pregnancy
 4 November 7, 2019  11:30-12:30  Zahraa Mohammed-Ali
Brock O'Neil
Laboratory Perspective of Prostate Cancer Testing
What is so controversial about PSA?
 5 November 21, 2019  14:00-15:00  Nicole White-Al Habeeb Biotin interference: Great hair, wrong results
 6 December 12, 2019  11:30-12:30  Robert Moore A Clinical Chemist's attempts to know sweat, detect over training and help detect the use of performance enhancing drugs and procedures in sport 
 7 January 9, 2020  11:30-12:30  Yu Chen  Persistent Mild Increase of Human Chorionic Gonadotropin 
 8 January 23, 2020  11:30-12:30  Shannon Haymond  Get the Basics: Aritificial Intelligence in Laboratory Medicine 
 9 February 6 , 2020  14:00-15:00  Paul M. Ridker, M.D.  Inflammatory Biomarkers and Anti-Cytokine Therapy for Atherosclerosis: Update 2020
CSCC Lectureship on Cardiovascular Disease 
 10 February 20. 2020 11:30-12:30  Glen J. Nowak Insights Into Communicating Science and Research to the Public
 11 March 5, 2020 11:30-12:30  Jennifer E. Layden, MD, PhD  E-cigarette Associated Acute Lung Injury: Novel Outbreak
CSCC Lectureship on Critical Care Medicine  
 12 March 19, 2020 14:00-15:00     
 13 April 2, 2020  11:30-12:30     
 14 April 16, 2020  14:00-15:00     
 15 April 30, 2020 11:30-12:30     
 16 May 14, 2020  11:30-12:30     
 17 May 28, 2020  14:00-15:00     

  

#10 February 20, 2020 Insights Into Communicating Science and Research to the Public
Speaker: Glen J. Nowak, Professor, University of Georgia (Athens, GA, US)
Abstract: Scientists and researchers often are called upon to communicate research results, findings, and recommendations to journalists, policymakers, and other lay-person audiences.  This presentation will provide insights into communication strategies and approaches that increase the effectiveness of those efforts.  The presentation will draw upon professional practices, communication research, and extensive front-line experience involving communicating science and research results and recommendations to journalists, policymakers, and the members of the broader public.  Factors that influence communication success will be identified and described.  In addition, guidance, examples, and tips will be provided for strengthening science and research-releated communication efforts, messages, and interviews.
Learning Objectives: At the end of this session, participants will be able to:
1)  understand some of the factors that affect science communication success and how to use that knowledge to improve communication efforts
2)  explain at least two factors that affect communication success or effectiveness in interacting with journalists, policymakers, or members of the public
3)  explain at least two ways that scientists and researchers can improve their ability to communicate science and research to journalists, policymakers, or members of the public.
#8 January 23, 2020 Get the Basics: Artificial Intelligence in Laboratory Medicine
Speaker: Shannon Haymond, PhD, Vice Chair for Computational Pathology, Ann & Robert H. Lurie Children's Hospital of Chicago
Abstract: There is great potential for applying advanced data analytic methods, such as artificial intelligence, in laboratory medicine. Innovation and implementation of these methods will benefit from the expertise and leadership of clinical laboratorians. To effectively contribute to these efforts, the clinical laboratory community must gain necessary foundational knowledge. This presentation will provide an introduction to key terminology, processes, and limitations of artificial intelligence and machine learning. 
Learning Objectives: At the end of this session, participants will be able to:
1)  define basic terms related to artificial intelligence
2)  describe the predictive modeling process
3)  ddiscuss examples of how artificial intelligence may be used in clinical laboratories. 
#7 January 9, 2020 Persistent Mild Increase of Human Chorionic Gonadotropin
Speaker: Yu Chen, MD, PhD, Chief and Medical Director, Department of Laboratory Medicine, Dr. Everett Chalmers Regional Hospital, Horizon Health Network 
Abstract: Pregnancy, ectopic pregnancy, retained products of conception, false positive human chorionic gonadotropin (hCG) test results, pituitary production of hCG, gestational trophoblastic disease and nontrophoblastic cancer are all possible causes of increases in serum hCG levels. A false-positive result of serum hCG, if undetected, may lead to unnecessary chemotherapy or hysterectomy. Recently we reported a persistent mild increase of hCG levels in a 31-year-old woman after spontaneous abortion (CMAJ 2017). In this lecture, quiescent gestational trophoblastic disease as well as the work up of differential diagnosis for a persistent low-level increase of serum hCG levels will be described. 
Learning Objectives:  At the conclusion of this session, participants will be able to:
1)  Describe the biochemistry and function of human chorionic gonadotropin (hCG).
2)  Explain differential diagnosis for a persistent low-level increase of serum hCG levels.
3)  Describe quiescent gestational trophoblastic disease, a benign condition characterized by a low-level increase of serum hCG.
#6 December 12, 2019 A Clinical Chemist's attempts to know sweat, detect over training and help to detect the use of performance enhancing drugs and procedures in sports
Speaker: Robert Moore, Professor, Canadian Memorial Chiropractic College (ex Sunnybrook and University of Toronto)
Abstract: Why and how I became a clinical chemist. My early initiatives on graduation and employment. Serendipitously I became involved in an effort to improve the formulation of a drink to be given to marathon runners. This led on to a project to search for markers for fatigue of over training in athletes. Also serendipitously I became an advisor to Athletics Canada on how to detect substance abuse in athletes. This role has continued with the World Masters (briefly) and the Canadian Masters Athletic Associations (ongoing). Experiences will be shared.
Learning Objectives: At the conclusion of this session, participants will be able to:
1)  Appreciate the benefits of being open minded in solving clinical problems.
2)  Understand some issues to do with electrolyte and water loss in athletes and people working under extreme conditions of heat and humidity.
3)  Know laboratory measured markers which may be used to assess chronic fatigue or over training in athletes.
4)  Appreciate some of the difficulties in making sports and similar activities fair and safe for all the participants and those who invest in such activities. This involves attempts at controlling doping: in particular performance enhancing drugs, medical procedures, sexual differentiation issues and genetic doping.
#5 November 21, 2019 Biotin interference: Great hair, wrong results
Speaker: Nicole White-Al Habeeb, Clinical Biochemist, LifeLabs
Abstract: Biotin interference can cause erroneous laboratory results when taken in high doses.  This interference can cause false high or false low results depending on the type of immunoassay.  This session will provide an overview of biotim interference in clinical immunoassays and describe the mechanism of interference in sandwich and ompetitive immunoassays.  Recent studies exploring the effect of different doses of biotin, and analyte concentration on the degree of interference will be discussed.  It will also introduce strategies to mitigate the risk of biotin interference.  Finally, a clinical case will be used to illustrate the impact of biotin interference on patient care.
Learning objectives: At the end of this session, participants will be able to:
1)  differentiate the mechanism of biotin interference in sandwich and competitive immunoassays
2)  understand the impact of biotin interference on patient care
3)  describe strategies to help mitigate risk of biotin interference
#4 November 7, 2019 Laboratory Perspective of Prostate Cancer Testing
Speaker: Zahraa Mohammed-Ali, Fellow in the Clinical Chemistry Training Program, University of Toronto 
Abstract:  This presentation is aimed at providing a comprehensive review of the laboratory’s perspective in testing for prostate cancer. As background information, we will briefly elaborate on prostate cancer pathogenesis and the biochemical features of the prostate-specific antigen (PSA). We will then discuss analytical aspects of PSA testing and evaluate the accuracy of PSA as a screening tool for prostate cancer. Additionally, we will examine the tests developed to measure different features of PSA with the goal of improving PSA test performance. Finally, we will explore scores based on various test combinations and the literature on their utility in predicting clinical outcomes. 
Learning Objectives:  At the end of this session, participants will be able to:
1)  understand analytical aspects of PSA testing and its accuracy as a screening tool for prostate cancer
2)  examine the various PSA-based tests that were developed to improve PSA test performance
3)  review prostate cancer scores established based on combinations of tests and their utility in predicting clinical outcomes.
What is so controversial about PSA?
Speaker: Brock O'Neil, MD, Assistant Professor, University of Utah, Huntsman Cancer Institute
Abstract: This presentation will discuss the historical and current uses for PSA as a screening tool for prostate cancer. This includes highlighting key clinical trials, discuss current and proposed recommendations, and areas for continued improvement.
Learning Objectives: At the end of this session, participants will be able to:
1)  understand current controversies and practice recommendations for the use PSA-based prostate cancer screening
2)  understand how providers can improve the value of prostate cancer screening.
#3 October 24, 2019 Development of an enzyme-free and wash-free technique for cell surface imaging
Speaker: Ashley Newbigging, BSc in Medical Laboratory Sciences, Graduate Student, Dept. of Laboratory Medicine & Pathology, University of Alberta
Abstract: Immunostaining procedures require wash steps and enzymes. Enzymes in techniques can limit reaction temperature, restrict reagent storage conditions, and increase cost. Wash steps are laborious and can complicate technical procedures and increase turnaround times. I introduce my novel technique designed for localized protein detection at room temperature without wash steps or enzymes. I used synthetic DNA oligonucleotides to facilitate the transduction of protein detection into an amplifiable fluorescence signal. I applied my technique for the detection of cell surface breast cancer biomarker, HER2, on live cells in under 45 min at room temperature. This presentation introduces the use and development of dynamic DNA assemblies as alternative analytical tools.
Learning Objectives: At the end of this session, participants will be able to:
1)  discuss how DNA can facilitate signal transduction and amplification
2)  describe the principle of a technique using dynamic DNA assemblies
  Current status of laboratory reference intervals during pregnancy
Speaker: Vilte Barakauskas, Clinical Biochemist, BC Children's and Women's Hospital 
Abstract:  Profound changes in maternal physiology occur throughout pregnancy, which can lead to significantly altered levels of biomarkers in the blood relative to nonpregnant females. Despite this, few laboratories establish or provide RIs appropriate for use during pregnancy. This presentation will provide an overview of a findings of a literature review of published RI studies performed in healthy pregnant women and to characterize gaps to inform future pregnancy RI studies. It will also introduce some of the local initiatives currently in progress to address these gaps. 
Learning Objectives:  At the end of this session, participants will be able to:
1)   explain why current laboratory RIs are insufficient for use during pregnancy
2)   recall key aspects study design that vary between published studies
3)   evaluate the validity of pregnancy RIs in the literature for their local population of mothers.
#2 October 10, 2019 The Role of Procalcitonin in Antimicrobial Stewardship
Speakers:  Dan Beriault PhD FCACB, Clinical Biochemist, Unity Health Toronto, Toronto ON
Brad Langford PharmD, Antimicrobial Stewardship Pharmacist, Unity Health Toronto, Toronto ON
Abstract: Procalcitonin (PCT) is a biomarker that can assist in differentiating bacterial from non-bacterial or non-infectious conditions. There is mounting evidence to support PCT as an approach to reduce unnecessary antimicrobial exposure, particularly in patients presenting with sepsis. In this presentation, we review the data supporting this biomarker and its role in antimicrobial stewardship. A summary of 1-year experience of using PCT at a community hospital will be presented, along with considerations for implementation in other hospital settings. 
Learning Objectives:  At the end of this session, participants will be able to:
1)  Provide an overview of procalcitonin (PCT) as a biomarker
2)  Explain the role of PCT in antimicrobial stewardship for critically ill patients
3)  Understand the challenges and opportunities in implementation of PCT testing 
#1 September 26, 2019 Quality Improvements from Canadian Laboratories
Speaker:  Ihssan Bouhtiauy, Head, Department of Biochemistry, Vitalite Health Network 
Abstract:  Since the last decade, there is a drive to manage laboratory test utilization. At our facility, we started laboratory test optimization in 1995 with the implementation of a decisional algorithm for TSH that allowed for reflex FT4. Since then, we implemented several different decisional algorithms (e.g. cardiac markers, coeliac, serum protein electrophoresis, testosterone, ANA/ENA; ANCA/anti-GBM). We also changed the list of tests included in many profiles (e.g. cardiac panel and lipid profiles). We discontinued obsolete tests (e.g. CK-MB, myoglobin, TT4, TT3, amylase) and significantly reduced the requests for other tests (e.g. vitamin D, folate, AST, measured LDL). Different approaches were used to implement these changes and an audit was done to evaluate if the target was achieved; if not, further adjustments were made. The results and financial benefit were very significant. The request for serum folate was reduced by 75% and 90% in two separate regional hospitals, respectively. AST was reduced by more than 85%.
At Vitalité Health Network, we have one university hospital, 3 regional hospitals and 6 community hospitals. We realized that the implementation of these changes is not “copy & paste”. In some cases, the approach to the implementation was different from one hospital to another and required good communication and collaboration with clinician colleagues. 
Learning Objectives:  At the end of this session, participants will be able to:
1)  understand different approaches used for the management of laboratory utilization
2)  be familiar with the positive impact of the management of laboratory utilization
3)  realize the importance of communication
Speaker:  David Richardson, Infectious Diseases Consultant and Medical Microbiologist, William Osler Health System
Abstract:  Clinical evaluation of the patient is key to best care and the optimal use of laboratory tests.  The majority of urine samples sent to the lab for culture are either negative or clinically unimportant.  At Osler, over 5,000 urine cultures were performed monthly with a positivity rate of only 16%.  Ideally, clinicians would not send a urine sample for culture when the patient is asymptomatic for a urinary tract infection.  We questioned whether clinically non-significant urines could be screened out to avoid setting them up for unnecessary culture.  Our study exhibited an accurate prediction for excluding non-significant urines in hospitalized patients with a rapid turaround time.  While markedly decreasing the number of urines being set up for culture there were no identified negative impacts to patient care.  Aside from the realized cost savings related to fewer urine cultures there may be downstream savings related to imporved antimicrobial usage and even decreased length of stay (LOS).
Learning Objectives:   At the end of this session, participants will be able to:
1)  appreciate the clinical impact of unnecessary urine cultures to patients, physicians and the healthcare system
2)  understand how urine flow cytometry technology can be used to select out clinically non-significant urines to avoid unnecessary culture
3)  appreicate that this quality initiative, which involved a forcing function, safely led to a significant reduction in unnecessary urine cultures and spent resources while improving patient care.
  Daniel Gauthier, Head of Regional Biochemistry Service, CISSS Montérégie-Centre 
  Regional and provincial laboratory reorganizations and restructurations are currently occuring across Canada in order to optimize the efficiency of laboratory services.  In this presentation, we will review the challenges associated with such changes from a clinico-administrative point of view that were experienced in Montérégie, Quebec.  We will also describe the mechanisms and solutions that were developed in order to overcome those challenges and move forward in an efficient manner. 
  At the end of this session, participants will be able to:
1)   anticipate and identify challenges associated with large-scale laboratory reorganisation from a clinico-administrative point of view
2)  develop locally adapted solutions and structures in which a large team of biochemists will be able to cooperate and contriubte efficiently to the unified laboratory, while respecting the expertise and interests of everyone.